Email To a Friend

January 5, 2017

Renaissance man

He put his gifts to good use

BY TONI CASHNELLI

Most of us are lucky to claim one talent or master a single skill.

Fr. Ed Lammert was good at everything.

On Dec. 26 when Ed’s family, friends and friars gathered at his funeral to say goodbye, they went on and on about his abilities. They were not exaggerating. As revealed through photo boards at St. Clement Church, Ed excelled in many areas: preaching, gardening, sports, woodworking, cooking, and more. “A Man for All Seasons” is how he was described.

What drew so many to pay their respects – it was standing room only at the Reception of the Body – was Ed’s vitality and the optimism he projected. Years ago, “I was living in Toledo, and things were not going well,” said Tom Lammert, Ed’s brother. Then he visited Ed at Duns Scotus. “I went there feeling down, and went away feeling much better. I wondered how many thousands [who knew Ed] were affected the same way.”

In Cumberland, Ky., where he served for years, “People really loved Ed” for his honesty and simplicity, said Fr. Mike Chowning, who ministered an hour away in Hazard. “He was a good pastor.” Oldenburg Sr. Amy Kistner was a friend of Ed’s St. Bernard family and a colleague in Appalachia. “He was always such a gem,” she said, and his philosophy on canon law was, “If you don’t know what to do, do what you think is right.”

PHOTO BY TONI CASHNELLIHomilist Maynard with Jane AnnEd in AppalachiaA standout in sports: Above, Ed and Roger Bacon’s 1946 football teamBaptizing a baby in Emporia, 1960PHOTOS BY TONI CASHNELLIEd’s story in photosA St. Francis graduateDressed in his best1 - 7<>

No complaints

When Fr. Fred Link was a cleric, Ed was Odo Lammert, Director of Brothers’ Formation at Duns Scotus. “I was in awe of his athleticism, his preaching,” Fred said. “He was one of those guys who was larger than life.”

Despite Ed’s abilities, “What struck me about him was his humility,” said classmate Fr. Tom Speier. In sports, “Ed was a great team player.” Off the field, “I never heard him complain about anything.”

Even as his heath failed – it was painful to see his physical decline – “He was most gracious all the time,” said Br. Norbert Bertram, who as Senior Friar Director supervised Ed’s care in retirement.

Fortunately for Ed, a large extended family helped him through his final months. No matter how weak he was, “He always said, ‘Thanks for coming,’” said Ed’s sister, Jane Ann Schildmeyer, to whom he was especially close.  Among family members at whose wedding Ed presided was Dennis Goldstein, married to Jane Ann’s daughter, Ann Marie. “He was a gentle soul, so passionate about life,” Dennis said of Ed. “It’s amazing the generations he spanned, the people he touched.”

Homilist Fr. Maynard Tetreault ministered with Ed at St. Stephen’s in Cumberland, Ky., “off and on for 23 years.” With all the talk of Ed’s gifts, “I thought we might think of the works done in God in the life of Ed Lammert,” Maynard said.

A love of labor

The first gift was “the Lammert family that supported Ed,” dozens of them sitting in six pews at St. Clement. Their faithfulness and loyalty is “enviable today. You folks have been such an important gift in Ed’s life.”

“The gift of God so dominant in Ed’s life is love itself,” Maynard said. “It created so many friendships. He loved the people of Appalachia,” was fascinated with their culture and enjoyed teaching them about Scripture on his popular radio show.

“Another great gift of Ed was his Franciscan traits of humility and poverty. He had this love of manual labor. Ed did everything: painted, landscaped, did carpentry work” and grew or caught most of the food for the friary. “He would trade seeds with people” for his legendary garden. Instead of replacing things, “He fixed things.” Ed’s wardrobe came from the place where clothing was donated and given away. “He was a terrific guy,” Maynard said. “I learned a lot about being Franciscan from Ed.”

Ed was gifted with discipline. “I think he got it from sports and athletics.” Daily after morning prayer, according to Maynard, “Ed would hit the desk and take care of written communications,” penning thank-you notes to “each and every benefactor. He probably raised over a million dollars as pastor of St. Stephen’s.” Afterward, “He would hit the garden. On Monday, his day off, he’d hit the lake and go fishing” to stock the freezer.

“We are here to celebrate the gifts God gave to us,” Maynard said. “Of course, Ed was a gift, too. We’re also here to pray for Ed. In the words of an old mountain hymn, Ed, may the angel band come to you and carry you up on their snow-white wings on golden stairs to see the King of heaven.”

“Always gracious”

Celebrant Fr. Jeff Scheeler noted that, “Liturgically, today is the Feast of St. Stephen, and Ed spent so many years ministering at St. Stephen.” He thanked St. Stephen’s current Pastor T. Manni George for being there “to represent all the people of the mountains.”

Of Ed’s talents, Jeff said, “He seemed to have it all. I, too, enjoyed veggies he grew and the fish he caught.” Sadly, “We all know the last couple of years he was not so full of vitality. It was sad but he bore that cross, always gracious, always, and that’s remarkable.”

Ed’s brother Bob spoke on behalf of the family. “We are extremely proud of Ed, especially that he served his entire adult life as a priest with the Franciscan Order. Most of all we want to thank the friars of the Province of St. John for providing Ed a challenging, meaningful, rewarding and spiritual life. God bless all of them.”

Ed’s gifts as a handyman will be put to good use in heaven, Bob said. “Rest assured, if the gates he just entered were at all squeaky, they are no longer.”

Taking a stand for peace and love

BY TONI CASHNELLI

Last July 17, the day the city welcomed the Republican National Convention, thousands of people in Cleveland joined hands on the Hope Memorial Bridge to stand up for love and peace.

Now, in the wake of the most divisive presidential election in memory, they’re encouraging others to do the same. On Jan. 15, the Sunday before the inauguration, like-minded people will gather in more than 30 cities across the U.S. (and in Canada, Guam and Australia) for Circle the Cities with Love, a non-partisan, no-issue event to help heal the country.

 The premise is simple, according to the Franciscan Sisters of the Poor, who will host a gathering in Cincinnati at their Centennial Barn, 110 Compton Road in Hartwell. At 3 p.m., “Participants will hold hands for 30 minutes in silent, peaceful witness and reflection. This is to embody the power of LOVE that brings healing, unity and peace to our cities, our country and our world through the simple act of holding hands and standing together as one in intentional silence at an important moment in our history.” Those of every religion, culture, and orientation are encouraged to participate.

For a list of meeting places – gatherings are also planned in Detroit, Mich., and Shreveport, La. – visit the event website at circlecitywithlove.com. You are welcome to join an existing group or create your own.

The event in Cleveland, organized by faith-based communities, was the brainchild of Sr. Rita Petruziello of the Congregation of St. Joseph. She wanted a “peaceful event to demonstrate the unifying and transformative power of love in the world.”

“By standing in unity and intentional silence, we will embody the power of love that brings peace and justice to our city, our country and our world at this important moment in our city’s history.

The Cincinnati Enquirer recently devoted sizable space to two of Roger Bacon’s more innovative programs:

  • Dec. 29, the Assisi Scholars program was the subject of a School News and Notes story. They explained how 18 seniors spent three years in “a rigorous academic program, starting as honors FILE PHOTOUnderwater hockey is not a spectator sport.freshman and continuing in sophomore through seniors years” to be rewarded with a trip to Assisi and Rome “to celebrate their hard work and accomplishments.”
  • Roger Bacon’s most unique sport, underwater hockey, was featured on a local section page Jan. 4 in a story titled, “The curious sport you’ve probably never heard of.” As they explain, “Watch and it only takes a few minutes to realize it’s not a spectator sport,” since the puck-pushing action takes place at the bottom of a pool.  “With four national titles under their caps since the program’s inception in 1997, Roger Bacon’s team is well-respected as a pioneer across the country and in Canada,” according to reporter Melanie Laughman. A video is posted at: High-school. Here’s something we didn’t know: “The sport, originally called Octopush, started in the United Kingdom in the 1950s to give divers something to do in the winter when they were unable to compete.”

  • New Year’s greetings from the ESC and US Franciscans: “Behold, I make all things new....” (Rev. 21.5). The Franciscan Friars of the English Speaking Conference wish you a happy, healthy and holy New Year! As we begin a new year, may we be refreshed with the Spirit to make peace more present in our hearts, in our homes and in our world.”
  • “As many head out to buy health club memberships or try again to quit smoking, let us decide to make this a year when we work freshly and tirelessly to make the Reign of God more present in our world.  Let us begin again, my sisters and brothers, for up until now, we have done little or nothing. Happy New Year from the US Franciscans!”
  • Paul Walsman, OFMFr. Paul Walsman said he was planning a “quiet” 92nd birthday celebration on Jan. 4 at St. John the Baptist Friary in Cincinnati. Paul is still traveling the country, sharing personal witness about Food for the Poor and its relief work throughout Latin America and the Caribbean.
  • Mother of Good Counsel Parish in Hazard, Ky., will hold a Memorial Mass for Fr. Rock Travnikar at 4 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 28. “Everyone is welcome to attend,” the parish announced on Facebook. “Fr. Rock was pastor here at Mother of Good Counsel from 1980 - 1993. He had a BIG personality and was loved by many. The best way to honor Fr. Rock is to find joy in the Gospel of Jesus Christ.”
  • Tom Richstatter, OFMFr. Tom Richstatter is in Washington, D.C., today, presenting a paper to the Eucharistic Prayer seminar at the North American Academy of Liturgy, which meets through Jan. 8. His topic: “The Eucharistic Prayer as Performance Art”.
  • Irish Provincial Minister Hugh McKenna warns of an e-mail scam in which “someone is impersonating the emeritus auxiliary bishop of Dublin, Br. Fiachra Ó Ceallaigh, OFM. We received an e-mail from msgr.oceallaigh@gmail.com purporting to be from Fiachra but it was immediately obvious to me that it was not from him…. I have confirmed with Fiachra that he did not send the e-mail. Please be advised as there seem to be several fake OFM bishops’ accounts in use.”
  • From a story on the Center of Concern’s websiteSt. Francis Seraph Parish shared this Christmas tree recycling tip on Facebook: “Take your tree to your backyard. It works as a great hiding place for birds, small animals, and outdoor creatures that are good for your garden. Add stringed popcorn and pine cones covered in peanut butter and bird seed and you feed those creatures and encourage them to stay in your garden. In the spring you can use the needles as mulch and garden paths and chop the branches for more mulch and borders.”

Jorge Ramos narrates Hate Rising.It’s hard to live in Detroit and not be aware of how the presidential election results are causing many of our fellow citizens worry, if not alarm. Keep in mind that neighboring Hamtramck is 50 percent Muslim! Recently, a good friend of mine and Imam of a local mosque has shared with me how both he and his congregation are feeling particularly at-risk these post-election days.  And they seem to have grounds for their feelings.

The Michigan Department of Civil Rights’ community outreach program has documented 30 hate incidents in Michigan in the 10 days after the Nov. 8 election, compared with only about seven on average during the entire year.  Also, the FBI released data on Nov. 13 that showed hate crimes against Muslims last year jumped to their highest level since 2001, following the Sept. 11 attacks.

Not surprisingly a recently released documentary called Hate Rising caught my attention.  I watched it this week and I recommend it to anyone who may be wondering how specifically all of last year’s election rhetoric may have affected our national consciousness. Here’ s the link: youtube

Just one warning, as the MPAA rating systems would say, it contains pervasive language!

Br. Al Mascia, JPIC chair

    

PHOTO BY TONI CASHNELLI

Left, Jeff Scheeler and Maynard Tetreault at St. Clement with Ed’s sister, Jane Ann Schildmeyer; center and right, Ed’s story in photos

PHOTO BY
FRANK JASPER, OFM
Dan Anderson, OFM
Ed Lammert, OFMThey say deaths come in threes, and that seems to have been true for us this Christmas.  Fr. Ed Lammert died on Dec. 17, Fr. Rock Travnikar on Dec. 25, and Fr. Ted Hattrup on Jan. 1, so maybe we will be OK for a while!  The holidays were anything but quiet in the Provincial staff offices, especially for Provincial Secretary Fr. Dan Anderson. Dan is the one who does most of the work: arranging the day and time for the funeral with families; notifying friends and relatives; dealing with the funeral home and cemetery; preparing the letter to the friars, notifying the General Curia; choosing music and getting liturgical ministers; printing the program; and making the memorial card.

This time he was juggling three sets of arrangements pretty much at the same time, especially with Rock and Ted.  I am grateful to Dan for putting his planning and organizing skills at the service of our brotherhood, not only in these situations, but for the past many years.  He will tell you he likes to make things look nice and go well by working in the background, but I want to publicly thank him for doing just that.

Rock Travnikar, OFMTed Hattrup, OFMI do want to tell you a funny story, though, that shows he is still human.  Dan prepares a special “sacramentary” for me with all the Mass prayers in one binder.  He personalizes it for each friar, doing a “search” and “replace” on the names.  A couple of funerals ago, the binder was prepared for Fr. Joe Rigali.  The next time we used it was for Fr. Bill Reichel, so Dan had the computer replace all the Joes and Josephs in the text with Bill and William.  That’s when Rocky got a promotion. In the Eucharistic prayer, the new text read, “May he make of us an eternal offering to you, so that we may obtain an inheritance with your elect, especially with the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God, with Blessed Bill her spouse…”  I caught the typo and made sure Joseph took his rightful place as Mary’s spouse, but I was suppressing laughter all the rest of the way through the Mass.

Thank you, Dan!

 

— Fr. Jeff Scheeler, OFM

Email To a Friend

Send comments or questions to: sjbfco@franciscan.org

ARCHIVES

Renaissance man

He put his gifts to good use

    

PHOTO BY TONI CASHNELLI

Top, Jeff Scheeler and Maynard Tetreault at St. Clement with Ed’s sister, Jane Ann Schildmeyer; above left and right, Ed’s story in photos

Taking a stand for peace and love

  • From a story on the Center of Concern’s websiteSt. Francis Seraph Parish shared this Christmas tree recycling tip on Facebook: “Take your tree to your backyard. It works as a great hiding place for birds, small animals, and outdoor creatures that are good for your garden. Add stringed popcorn and pine cones covered in peanut butter and bird seed and you feed those creatures and encourage them to stay in your garden. In the spring you can use the needles as mulch and garden paths and chop the branches for more mulch and borders.”

PHOTO BY
FRANK JASPER, OFM
Dan Anderson, OFM
Ed Lammert, OFMThey say deaths come in threes, and that seems to have been true for us this Christmas.  Fr. Ed Lammert died on Dec. 17, Fr. Rock Travnikar on Dec. 25, and Fr. Ted Hattrup on Jan. 1, so maybe we will be OK for a while!  The holidays were anything but quiet in the Provincial staff offices, especially for Provincial Secretary Fr. Dan Anderson. Dan is the one who does most of the work: arranging the day and time for the funeral with families; notifying friends and relatives; dealing with the funeral home and cemetery; preparing the letter to the friars, notifying the General Curia; choosing music and getting liturgical ministers; printing the program; and making the memorial card.

Renaissance man

He put his gifts to good use

    

PHOTO BY TONI CASHNELLI

Top, Jeff Scheeler and Maynard Tetreault at St. Clement with Ed’s sister, Jane Ann Schildmeyer; center and above, Ed’s story in photos